Tag Archives | green garlic

Coconut Red Lentil Soup

I love coconut. I mean, really love it. It’s hard for me to keep bags of the sweetened, flaked kind in my pantry because I just want to eat it all in one sitting with a spoon. I even tried putting coconut milk in my coffee once, which was a bad idea and is, to this date, the only coconut experiment I’ve conducted that was really disgusting.

Anyway, I saw that 101 Cookbooks had posted this recipe last week. All I had to read was the title and I was in. Then I saw that it involved lentils and a few other ingredients I had in the fridge from my Greenling box (cilantro, green onions, and a carrot) and I knew I’d found a recipe to make over and over again.

It lived up to its promise. This soup is thick and rich, but still has a hint of brightness from the coconut milk, cilantro, and golden raisins. I used light coconut milk to make it a little healthier, but other than that this is the rare recipe I didn’t really fiddle with. You can skip the curry-toasting step to save time, and cook the lentils and split peas (both found in the bulk bins at Whole Foods) the night before for a meal you can just toss together and simmer. In the original recipe, serving the soup over brown rice is optional, but I highly recommend it because it adds a nice texture.

Coconut Red Lentil Soup (from 101 Cookbooks)

1 cup yellow split peas
1 cup red lentils (masoor dal)
7 cups water
1 medium carrot, cut into 1/2-inch dice
2 tablespoons fresh peeled and minced ginger
2 tablespoons curry powder
2 tablespoons butter or ghee
8 green onions (or green garlic, if you have some from last week’s box), thinly sliced
1/3 cup golden raisins
1/3 cup tomato paste
1 14-ounce can coconut milk
2 teaspoons salt
one handful cilantro, chopped
cooked brown rice, for serving (optional)

Rinse split peas and lentils well. Place them in an extra-large soup pot, cover with the water, and bring to a boil. Reduce heat to a simmer and add the carrot and 1/4 of the ginger. Cover and simmer for about 30 minutes, or until the split peas are soft.

In the meantime, in a small dry skillet or saucepan over low heat, toast the curry powder until it is quite fragrant, about 3-4 minutes. Keep an eye on it, because the powder can burn quickly. Set aside. Place the butter in a pan over medium heat, add half of the green onions, the remaining ginger, and raisins. Saute for two minutes stirring constantly, then add the tomato paste and saute for another minute or two more.

Add the toasted curry powder to the tomato paste mixture, mix well, and then add this to the simmering soup along with the coconut milk and salt. Simmer, uncovered, for 20 minutes or so. The texture should thicken up. Serve over brown rice, sprinkled with cilantro and the remaining green onions.

Serves 6.

Comments { 0 }

Slow Cooker Goat "Bourguignon"

A few weeks ago, I picked up some goat meat on a whim at the Pearl Brewery farmer’s market in San Antonio. I had been reading a lot about it, but found it in local grocery stores. I’m so glad I tried it; I am now a total convert and preach the marvels of goat to anyone who will listen.

It was frozen (for food safety reasons, most of the meat sold at the farmer’s market is frozen), so using the slow-cooker was a great solution. If it wasn’t frozen, I would have browned the goat in some bacon fat before putting in the slow-cooker. This by no means is a traditional “bourguignon,” but it uses many of the same flavors. I kind of just dumped whatever reminded me of traditional boeuf bourguignon in the slow-cooker.

This is the kind of dish into which you can add whatever comes in your Local Box that week. Last time I made this with green garlic and red spring onions; this time I had a ton of carrots and used the pattypan squash. If you have mushrooms, those would be fabulous too. I’ve included the basic recipe, but the intent is that you improvise with whatever’s in season/on hand.

Ingredients:

  • 1 bunch of carrots, peeled and chopped into medium-sized chunks
  • 1 large onion or a few spring onions (either red or yellow, though I used red) chopped
  • 3 bay leaves
  • 1 tsp. fresh thyme, chopped
  • 1/2 bottle red wine (I used a French burgundy.)
  • 1-14 oz. can low-sodium beef stock
  • 1-6 oz. can tomato paste
  • 1 lb. goat stew meat
  • 1/2 tsp. salt and a few grinds of pepper

Directions:

  • Put the chopped vegetables and the herbs in the bottom of the slow-cooker, then add the tomato paste and liquids and stir well.
  • Add the goat so that all of the pieces are covered in the liquid, then add the salt and pepper.
  • Cover and cook on high for 3 hours, then on low for 2 hours (alternatively, low for 8 hours — 9 if it’s frozen — would be okay also).

Verdict:
This was PHENOMENAL. I’ve made boeuf bourguignon in the slow-cooker before using a similar recipe, but the goat was much more moist and flavorful. The goat was more flavorful than beef, but not game-y at all. I served this with garlic mashed potatoes (saute ~3 cloves of garlic in butter, then add milk or buttermilk to the skillet to heat through, then add to the boiled potatoes and whisk everything in a stand mixer until smooth), so it was nice to have so much sauce with it, but if you want a thicker gravy, stir about 1 tsp. cornstarch into the beef stock before adding to the slow-cooker.

Comments { 3 }

Slow Cooker Goat “Bourguignon”

A few weeks ago, I picked up some goat meat on a whim at the Pearl Brewery farmer’s market in San Antonio. I had been reading a lot about it, but found it in local grocery stores. I’m so glad I tried it; I am now a total convert and preach the marvels of goat to anyone who will listen.

It was frozen (for food safety reasons, most of the meat sold at the farmer’s market is frozen), so using the slow-cooker was a great solution. If it wasn’t frozen, I would have browned the goat in some bacon fat before putting in the slow-cooker. This by no means is a traditional “bourguignon,” but it uses many of the same flavors. I kind of just dumped whatever reminded me of traditional boeuf bourguignon in the slow-cooker.

This is the kind of dish into which you can add whatever comes in your Local Box that week. Last time I made this with green garlic and red spring onions; this time I had a ton of carrots and used the pattypan squash. If you have mushrooms, those would be fabulous too. I’ve included the basic recipe, but the intent is that you improvise with whatever’s in season/on hand.

Ingredients:

  • 1 bunch of carrots, peeled and chopped into medium-sized chunks
  • 1 large onion or a few spring onions (either red or yellow, though I used red) chopped
  • 3 bay leaves
  • 1 tsp. fresh thyme, chopped
  • 1/2 bottle red wine (I used a French burgundy.)
  • 1-14 oz. can low-sodium beef stock
  • 1-6 oz. can tomato paste
  • 1 lb. goat stew meat
  • 1/2 tsp. salt and a few grinds of pepper

Directions:

  • Put the chopped vegetables and the herbs in the bottom of the slow-cooker, then add the tomato paste and liquids and stir well.
  • Add the goat so that all of the pieces are covered in the liquid, then add the salt and pepper.
  • Cover and cook on high for 3 hours, then on low for 2 hours (alternatively, low for 8 hours — 9 if it’s frozen — would be okay also).

Verdict:
This was PHENOMENAL. I’ve made boeuf bourguignon in the slow-cooker before using a similar recipe, but the goat was much more moist and flavorful. The goat was more flavorful than beef, but not game-y at all. I served this with garlic mashed potatoes (saute ~3 cloves of garlic in butter, then add milk or buttermilk to the skillet to heat through, then add to the boiled potatoes and whisk everything in a stand mixer until smooth), so it was nice to have so much sauce with it, but if you want a thicker gravy, stir about 1 tsp. cornstarch into the beef stock before adding to the slow-cooker.

Comments { 3 }

Karen’s Green Pasta Sauce

greensauceI met Karen Hett from Sun City at a Greenling cooking class held last fall at Green Gate Farms. As conversations among local foodies are wont to do, ours soon turned to the subject of greens: What to do with so many collards, kale, chard, and more? Karen emailed me this recipe, for which she credits lots of sources and plenty of tweaking, a few days later.  I modified it a bit according to the contents of my refrigerator last night, but the results were still tasty – and outrageously nutritious. All told, I used up a bunch of Local Box spinach, one of collards, some green garlic, a handful of cilantro, and about a third of a Meyer lemon.

6 cups packed greens, including chard, basil, parsley, stems removed
1 small onion, chopped
3 garlic cloves, minced
red pepper flakes
salt to taste
1 cup grated Parmesan cheese (not canned)
1/2 small lemon, sliced thinly
2 tbsp olive oil
1 cup chicken broth, can be made from bouillon cube
chopped olives, green or black
pine nuts
one cup sliced chicken, if desired
1 lb cooked pasta, your choice. This works well with any tube pasta or linguine.

In food processor with the motor running, drop in garlic, onions, lemon; add greens a little at time.

Add 1/2 cup chicken broth and olive oil until a paste is formed.

Remove from food processor and place in sauce pan with grated Parmesan. Add
chicken slices if using. Stir until the cheese is melted, adding more broth if
necessary. Taste for seasonings, add salt and red pepper flakes.

Serve over hot pasta of your choice, sprinkling with chopped olives and pine nuts. Pass extra Parmesan.

Comments { 1 }

Karen's Green Pasta Sauce

greensauceI met Karen Hett from Sun City at a Greenling cooking class held last fall at Green Gate Farms. As conversations among local foodies are wont to do, ours soon turned to the subject of greens: What to do with so many collards, kale, chard, and more? Karen emailed me this recipe, for which she credits lots of sources and plenty of tweaking, a few days later.  I modified it a bit according to the contents of my refrigerator last night, but the results were still tasty – and outrageously nutritious. All told, I used up a bunch of Local Box spinach, one of collards, some green garlic, a handful of cilantro, and about a third of a Meyer lemon.

6 cups packed greens, including chard, basil, parsley, stems removed
1 small onion, chopped
3 garlic cloves, minced
red pepper flakes
salt to taste
1 cup grated Parmesan cheese (not canned)
1/2 small lemon, sliced thinly
2 tbsp olive oil
1 cup chicken broth, can be made from bouillon cube
chopped olives, green or black
pine nuts
one cup sliced chicken, if desired
1 lb cooked pasta, your choice. This works well with any tube pasta or linguine.

In food processor with the motor running, drop in garlic, onions, lemon; add greens a little at time.

Add 1/2 cup chicken broth and olive oil until a paste is formed.

Remove from food processor and place in sauce pan with grated Parmesan. Add
chicken slices if using. Stir until the cheese is melted, adding more broth if
necessary. Taste for seasonings, add salt and red pepper flakes.

Serve over hot pasta of your choice, sprinkling with chopped olives and pine nuts. Pass extra Parmesan.

Comments { 1 }